Make workplace empathy meaningful: Provide employee benefits that help women advance their careers.

Empathy is meaningful when employees are listened to, when they feel that they are heard and when leadership commits to implementing solutions that enable them to thrive, prosper and successfully manage personal and professional responsibilities. The current pandemic provides employers with an outstanding opportunity to implement solution-focused employee benefits, particularly those which impact women and their professional advancement. There are five areas of action in which leaders can make empathy meaningful: 1. Invest in communication best practices; 2. Prioritize and implement disability risk mitigation measures; 3. Critically examine current benefits and the corporate culture; 4. Empower women to manage their careers & continue to support their professional advancement; and 5. Leadership must commit to demonstrate empathy for employees

Ways to wellness and employee engagement during the pandemic

Admittedly, during a pandemic, keeping employees motivated and engaged is difficult. Basic human needs for personal safety, stable relationships, job security and significance are top of mind for employees facing economic uncertainty, fearing job losses, and carrying the dual burden of professional and personal responsibilities. When unmet, these needs put employee wellness and engagement in jeopardy.

Treating Employees as Customers

Consider this question: Whose needs must be met first for businesses to succeed – the shareholder, the employee or the customer? For some people, the answer is clear cut, a no-brainer. Others will reply, “it depends” as the answer will be found in the most compelling case made by any of the three stakeholders. ForContinue reading “Treating Employees as Customers”

Dismantle silos for effective change

According to research by McKinsey & Company, about 70% of all organizational changes fail. Often, such failures are blamed on staff or on external constraints, such as cost, workload and legislation. Some say that it’s the fault of executives and middle managers who resist change to protect their areas of influence. Others cite the lackContinue reading “Dismantle silos for effective change”